Indonesia Emergency

Situation Update on Indonesia Tsunami response

On December 22nd 2018, the partial collapse of Anak Krakatau Volcano in Indonesia caused an undersea landslide, triggering a significant tsunami event which affected five districts (Pandeglang, Serang, South Lampung, Tanggamus and Pesawaran) in the two provinces of Banten and Lampungs.

According to OCHA, the tsunami led to extensive damage along the coastal areas, killing at least 430 people, with a further 159 still missing, and 1,500 injured. Approximately, 2,000 homes are fully damaged and 22,000 individuals are displaced living in makeshift shelters and temporary camps.

Damaged Building
Sulawesi, Indonesia
Over 1,200 people have been left without homes following the tsunami.

The results of the latest assessment:

ACTED convened a rapid assessment in two districts in the province of Banten on December 25th and 26th 2018.

The most affected districts are Pandeglang and Serang in Java Island in the province of Banten with widespread damage to tourism infrastructure including the wide scale destruction of hotels, shops and restaurants.

In relation to the destruction of livelihoods, in the coastal villages of Pandeglang district, communities who depend upon fishing have been severely affected with the loss of shelters, belongings, and 350 boats.

Man searches home
ACTED 2018
Thousands of families lost both their homes and all their belongings as waves ripped through their villages.

Summary of the current humanitarian situation

Rescue teams remain active on the ground searching for missing people and removing debris, while engineers have already reopened roads and restored electricity. Despite the fast progress of these efforts, among the displaced population there is a widespread fear of another tsunami, hence a great reluctance to return at the present time.

Local government, philanthropists and NGOs are providing assistance in the affected areas. The assistance is presently comprised of drinking water, cooked food, medicines, and debris removal from roads, streets and homes. NGOs have established free medical camps to assist the injured persons.

Affected families are living in small temporary camps and with relatives. Despite the efforts of NGOs, the quantity of water of drinking water is limited to one litre per person per day. Although NGOs have been providing food, uncertainty prevails about how long such provision will continue, with media reports setting the period of emergency assistance at two weeks.

Damaged house
ACTED 2018
The damage caused by the tsunami was signifiacnt. In the area assessed, 73 hotels had been destroyed.

Should the current level of assistance be withdrawn, it is likely that those displaced will have to rely on debts or migrate to other towns to seek work as a means of supporting their families.

Sanitation facilities were also severely damaged, with up to 50 families reliant on a single latrine in certain areas of high displacement concentrations. Due to the heavy rains and flooding in the area, the occurrence of water borne diseases is highly likely to increase. The local NGO “KUN” which runs a medical camps in Pandeglang, has already reported the registration of such cases.

Water Pool
ACTED 2018
The tsunami took place during the rain reason in Indonesia, further increasing the risk of water borne disease.

ACTED is currently preparing its proposal of response based on the following identified needs:

  • Approximately 15,000 individuals in Serang and Pandeglang districts require food and water assistance for at least two months until the situation has stabilized.
  • Approximately 1,200 vulnerable families whose houses and latrines were damaged/destroyed will require assistance in establishing transitional shelters and latrines, as well as additional household hygiene items.
  • 300 shopkeepers and fishermen have lost their livelihoods, and will thus require immediate cash assistance to meet their basic household needs.

ACTED in Indonesia

In Indonesia, ACTED  is cooperating  with national NGO partners to respond to the earthquake and tsunami which struck Sulawesi province in September 2018. The capital office of ACTED is in Jakarta which is around 110 KM from the recently affected (Pandeglang).

Formerly, ACTED worked in Indonesia until 2015 with activities covering emergency response, preparedness to and mitigation of natural disaster as well as development programmes. With a longstanding presence of over 15 years in the region, the teams have been contributing to disaster preparedness and risk reduction and to providing emergency assistance to the most vulnerable while strengthening their resilience